Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Catalyst - Shane Hipps

Random thoughts...
I got to admit, Shane Hipps lost me. He must have lost several people because I had many people on my team ask me what I thought he was trying to say. At first, he gave credence to the line: "the methods must change, but the message should never change." Then he said something along the lines that the message does change as well. In paraphrasing Marshall McLuhan, Shane stated that how you say something determines how your message is understood. (The medium is the message). But then he went back and stated that the message is unchanging and everchanging.

I did pull one nugget out: he compared a guard to a gardener. If you think about the role of a guard, a guard protects from negative circumstances and his placement is motivated by fear. A gardener is motivated by love and in anticipation of what is expected to growth. Shane then made the statement that we should never protect at the expense of growth.

3 comments:

Jason said...

It seemed as though he was intentionally being very vague about the "ever-changing unchanging message" as though he was wanting us to think more than he wanted to present a definition of what he meant. Unfortunately he didn't give me anything to start with - and therefore nothing to think about.

I thought the guard vs gardener point was interesting. Another thing I took away from him was the difference between words and pictures. What I found particularly interesting (although he did not point this out) was how Jesus used words to paint a picture!

The Good Samaritan is a great example, and is a picture that's worth more than a thousand words (regardless of whether or not Hipps said you could compare the two). So the takeaway for me is using words to paint a picture that communicates truth and may even bypass some of the natural tendency to fight/argue that Hipps pointed out.

abby said...

he totally lost me... I don't even know what I thought of anything he said...

billy v said...

Good, you picked up something that I forgot about.