Tuesday, November 25, 2008

I Agree with Darrell Bock...

About Bible translations. Here is a snippet of a recent blog post:
So my point is to be a little skeptical when someone hails one translation as far superior than another, or especially when they hype it as THE one. Relax, more than one version might be good for your Bible study now and again. Often the best rendering will depend on the verse or unit in question and will shift from version to version. Most do a pretty good job as a rule. Where translations differ on a verse, you can know that there is an interpretive or textual wording issue present, if the difference is not merely the choice between different synonyms.


Find it here

8 comments:

W. Hunter Patterson said...

anything but The Message....bible cliff notes

billy v said...

It has its place...

jason allen said...

I've seen the danger of dogmatically declaring a version "THE" version as he mentions.

I think the practical difficulty is to not name a Bible for use is a disservice to people. Because most people are never going to have 5 Bibles they use for study, comparing between them. No, they have one Bible. So what is the one Bible that will be most helpful.

This is why we suggest a certain Bible that can be used as a good all-around translation.

What do you make of that practical dilemma? Have you seen this or is it just me?

me said...

The Message by far is not THE one, but some times, I like the way it is worded... just makes things stick out. Like 2 Cor. 12:~7 or so.. When Paul is talking about his thorn in the flesh, The Message calls it the "gift of a handicap". I like that for some reason.

billy v said...

JA,
I think the best option is to educate people on the differences between the Bible translation methods (formal equivalence vs dynamic equivalence) tell them which Bible's do which and let them choose. I know my preference. I have no problem with churches making a conscious choice of a pew Bible. I don't think that choice is made always wisely, but that's me.

Rick said...

Not that many people are still using it, but The Living Bible is pretty awful. Same goes for The World Version. Unfortunately, if you couple a criticism for the aforementioned with a comment on your preference, you often get slammed for what Bock is criticizing.

The truth is, we have to make statements about some of the tripe that passes for translations...it's just not as narrow as some would like. The opposite and equally damaging error is to welcome all the many versions as valid and useful for teaching.

Concerning The Message, I absolutely love his textual choices in many instances, but am pretty luke-warm toward the whole. I would always urge caution in using The Message for this reason alone.

Having said this, Peterson is the only guy that I've seen that translates 1 Corinthians 12:31 in a contextually pleasing manner. Go figure.

Rick said...

Random thought. Since Bock is making the comment, I wonder if this isn't meant to be a shot at those that are "NET BIBLE" exclusive in his world. I'm sure it's common amongst his peers.

The MAN Fan Club said...

When I prepare a bible study lesson I like to have a few translations as well as different student bibles. I often learn something from cross referencing a verse or just reading the notes at the bible.

What about the, "I grew up with this version so this is THE one?"

It is a little distracting if a pastor uses one verse and you have another verse like the DLV....D.Lang Version. At least our pastor shows the verses on the video screen.